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Showing posts tagged with: interview success

Interviews are a crucial part of the job application process. It's a chance for both the employer and the candidate to know each other better. While the interviewer will ask many questions to determine your suitability for the role, it's essential to keep in mind that there are some questions you should avoid asking. Hiring managers will be looking for more than your qualifications and the worst thing you can do is give the wrong impression based on your questions. In this blog post, we'll discuss five questions that you should avoid asking during an interview. 

5 Questions To Avoid Asking At Your Next Interview

Asking bad questions in your interview may indicate a lack of interest, preparation, or even intelligence. Similarly, asking a good question at the wrong time can be just as damaging. Most of these questions should never be asked in a job interview, and some questions should be saved until a job offer has been made. When an interviewer asks you if you have any questions during a job interview, this is your opportunity to do three important things:
  • Collect final information on the things that will help you make your decision
  • Demonstrate to the interviewer that you have listened and have done some research
  • Show them you are interested, a good fit and would be a great choice if they make you an offer

#1 Asking About Salary And Benefits

Asking about money can be really awkward. While it's important to know the salary and benefits offered for your potential role, you need to avoid asking about it too soon. A first interview for example. If you ask about it too soon, it may give the impression that you're more interested in the compensation than the actual job.  Questions like:
  • How much will I get paid
  • How soon can I get a raise?
  • What discounts do I get?
  • Will you pay for training or an advanced degree for me?
  • What other benefits do you provide?
can give the impression you are not really interested or passionate about the job. Overall it presents a more selfish persona. Obviously, these are important things to know, particularly if you are lucky enough to be comparing several job offers! An exception to this rule would be in they ask you for salary expectation or current salary. In this case you can tell them your salary expectation /requirements are dependent on other aspects of the job like flexibility, training, or raises.  

#2 Asking About Time Off

This can be a tricky one and it comes up all the time as a recruiter. Asking about time off during your first interview may send the wrong message to the employer. It can come across as though you're not committed to the job, and you're already thinking about taking time off. It's best to wait until you've been offered the job before you ask about vacation time or other time off. Try to avoid bluntly asking about time you won't be at work.
  • How much paid vacation time would I get?
  • How soon can I take a vacation after I start work?
  • How many paid personal and/or sick days are allowed?
You are there to talk about the job and demonstrate why you would be a great choice for them.  As with point #1, these kinds of questions give the impression that you are more interested what you get than what you get to do. However, before you start, at some point in the interview process, you should be asked if you have any holidays/time off booked. You can discuss your requirements for vacation and holidays, but this should be part of the negotiation when there is an offer on the table for you. There are a great many benefits to taking time off between jobs - always bear this in mind when you are talking about when you can start!  

#3 Asking Overly Personal Questions

While you want to seem friendly and relaxed, asking personal questions during the interview might be considered inappropriate. Make sure you are aware of the company's formality and what is expected. If in doubt, speak to your recruiter! Questions about the interviewer's marital status, religion, or political views should be avoided. It's important to keep the conversation professional and relevant to the job.  Questions like this are completely inappropriate and will probably kill your chances of getting a job:
  • Want to go out for drinks or coffee later?
  • Is s/he married or have a significant other?
  • Are all the employees here “hot” (or — much worse — “as hot as you are”)?
(They seem crazy don't they, but these are all examples we have seen in the recruitment industry!) Focus on questions about the job. These questions may feel like they’re tension breakers or funny, but they aren’t appropriate in a job interview.

#4 Asking About The Company's Reputation

Asking about the company's reputation may give the impression that you're not familiar with the company. It's essential to do your research before the interview and have a good understanding of the company's history and reputation. As a candidate, you should focus on how you can contribute to the company instead of questioning its reputation.  Avoid questions like "what does the company do?" or "who is the main competition" because you should already know these from your research and asking them will seem as though you are unprepared and uninterested. Research the employer and the location before you go to the interview to be prepared to ask good questions in the interview. If you aren’t interested in them, they surely are not interested in you.  A good way to find out more about the company than you can find online is to ask about company culture, for example:
  • How would you describe your company culture in 3/5 words?
  • What kinds of employee achievements are most recognised?
  • What is your favourite part of working here that I wouldn't see on a tour/read about online?

#5 Asking About The Job Duties

While you should show an interest in the job role and your duties, asking about them in the wrong way may give the impression that you've a) not familiar with this kind of job, b) haven't read the job description or c0 you've read it and forgotten it!
  • What does the person in this job do?
  • What are the requirements of the job?
Questions like this seem to show that you haven't prepared at all - not a good look! In any interview, it's important to read the job description thoroughly before the interview and have a good understanding of the role's responsibilities. If you have any questions about the job duties, it's best to ask for clarification rather than asking what they are. You should speak to your recruiter about the role and description if you aren't sure. It’s always a good idea to bring a copy of the job description into the interview with you. Review it before the interview, and refer to it during the interview, as appropriate.

So, What Should You Ask In Your Interview?

You need to prepare by reading and researching the company, job role and if you know who you are interviewing with you can research them! Often, they will answer most of the common interview questions. Be prepared and think about more questions than you think you will need and take notes throughout the interview so you can remember things that catch your interest. Personal (but still professional) questions are great for example:
  • What do you enjoy most about working here?
  • What have past employees done to succeed in this role?
  • What qualities are the most important to succeeding in this role?
  • Is there anything else I can do or provide to help you make your decision?
  • Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications or experience?
For more interview tips you can head to our previous blog post on the how to interview well. And make sure you follow up with these 4 things to do immediately after your interview to seal the deal.  In conclusion, it's important to keep in mind that interviews are a two-way conversation. While it's essential to prepare for the interview and ask plenty of questions, there are definitely questions you should avoid asking. By avoiding these questions, you'll be able to make a positive impression on the employer and increase your chances of getting the job.  Looking for a new role? Head to Dotgap jobs now for the latest in digital marketing and ad agency vacancies.

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If you are working in digital marketing, it is highly unlikely you will not have an online presence. We have talked about the importance of carrying out a social media audit to make sure your social media and online presence is professional and consistent. this article will look at taking this one step further to actively use social media to your advantage. Social media can be a powerful tool to help boost your career. Whether you use it to network, stay up-to-date on industry news, or showcase your work, here are 3 ways to boost your online profile. 

#1 Use Social Media to Connect With Professionals 

One of the best ways you can use social media to further your career is to connect with professionals in your field. Whether you join a Facebook group or use Twitter to follow influential people in your industry, these connections help you stay informed about the latest industry trends and news and help you build a strong network of contacts that could be useful in your career. Additionally, engaging with these professionals can help you gain knowledge and valuable insights into the field, and even create opportunities for you to make more meaningful connections. Ultimately, building relationships with professionals in your field can be an important way to support your career growth.  When engaging online, be helpful. You can foster long-term relationships by offering advice with no expectation of anything in return.  Connect with people at all levels, just remember to keep your connections related to your industry and interests and introduce yourself with a reason for your connection!

#2 Showcase Your Work on Social Media

Social media can be used as a powerful tool to showcase your work. By using it to promote your portfolio, share your latest projects and engage with potential employers and collaborators you can easily boost your online profile. Using platforms like Instagram, LinkedIn and other popular networks you can reach a wider audience and create a more visible presence.  Additionally, social media can be used to efficiently promote your work and gain recognition by showcasing your skills, experience and accomplishments. Furthermore, engaging with potential employers and collaborators can be a great way to build relationships and gain insight into the industry, while also reinforcing your commitment to the field. Ultimately, using social media to promote your work is a valuable asset to your professional career. 

#3 Stay Up-To-Date With Industry News

Social media is invaluable for staying up-to-date on industry news. Following relevant hashtags or joining industry-specific groups can be an incredibly useful way to stay connected with the latest trends and developments, as well as helping you  build connections with other professionals in the same field. Through such platforms, you can stay informed about the latest industry news, developments, and strategies, and be better equipped to make informed decisions. Using your new found knowledge you can share interesting articles and content to boost your online profile. Additionally, you can engage with confidence in discussions, share ideas and resources potentially leading to collaborations and other opportunities that can help further your career.

Make Social Media Work For You

As you can see, social media can be an effective tool for boosting your career. Whether you use it to connect with professionals, showcase your work, or stay up-to-date on industry news, there are many ways to use it and many platforms to choose from, with these 3 tips, you’ll be well on your way to maximising your social media presence.  Remember: consistency and professionalism are key.  For more job search tips, advice on interviews or digital marketing career paths head to our blog here.  

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Job interviews are your opportunity to demonstrate your personality and skills in action.  In your marketing interview, you should be ready to talk about your experiences, interests, strengths and weaknesses. Whether you are a graduate or a seasoned professional, interviews can be daunting.  In this article, we will review some interview basics and look more closely at how you can ace your next marketing agency interview.  

Interview Basics

You may have read our previous blog post on the Top 5 Interview Dos and Don'ts earlier this year, but if not, here are the basics: Be prepared, be on time, dress well. While different companies will have different dress codes, it is always a good idea to wear a suit or similar. You should practise answers to questions and prepare relevant questions to ask such as "What is the culture like at this agency?", "how big of a team would I work on" or " what's a client that the agency would love to land?" This shows you are interested in more than just a pay check and can help demonstrate commitment, particularly helpful if you are a graduate with limited experience.  Remember, as we come into the busy fourth quarter you might need to be ready at short notice so preparation is key.

Your Marketing Agency Interview

Now for some more specifics. Marketing agency jobs often require you to work quickly, as part of a team on different campaigns. It is a fast-paced office environment. You will need to demonstrate creativity, adaptability and strong communication skills. If the role is client-facing, interpersonal skills will also be important. 

Prove It With Numbers

In your interview, make sure you have numbers to back up your stories and experience. Data and metrics are a sure way to impress, especially at a digital marketing agency. Using numbers can give more weight to your experiences and ultimately make them more convincing in regard to showing your value. Some ways you can incorporate this into your interview are:
  • How many clicks were generated from campaigns
  • How many followers were gained as a result of your efforts
  • How much profit you generated

Learn and Upskill

Everyone is looking to get ahead of the competition, and in marketing agencies you will always be learning from your clients, co-workers and tasks. You can boost your chances of acing your agency interview by demonstrating your desire to learn and upskill. You can use certifications to get a deeper understanding of the tools that are used in the marketing industry and use your knowledge to impress your interviewer. The great news is there are plenty of free online resources that  you can use to upskill remotely.  

 Good Luck Out There!

Are you looking for your next marketing job? You can see all of our current vacancies at dotgap.com. Register with us today to help find your ideal job. For more interview tips, industry insight and more, visit our blog. You might enjoy these similar articles from the archive. What to Expect From a Second interview In-Demand Marketing Jobs and How To Get Them    

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There’s no escaping social media these days. Whether you use it for you career or not, you need to consider the implications of what could be decades of historical data available online about you. That fan blog you wrote when you were at school for example, or some outdated jokes exchanged with friends from the late noughties. We have talked about using Linked In to help get a job, but it is important you do not overlook other social media platforms as an active job seeker. All social media, used correctly can be great for job seekers. It could, however, be costing you interview opportunities. Recruiters and potential employers may actively search for applicants on social media when they are reviewing your CV so if you have an online presence, you need to make sure it is working in your favour with a social media audit. Read on to find out what you can do to give your social media the once over.

Five Tips For Optimising Your Social Media Presence:

 

Photo by Caio on Pexels.com

#1 Check Google

You may not think you have much of an online presence but you might be mentioned or tagged elsewhere, or perhaps you have an old profile somewhere you have forgotten about. Google your name and social media handles and remove any information you do not want public. Try setting up a free Google alert to let you if you turn up somewhere in the future. 

#2 Privacy Settings Vary

Privacy settings vary from platform to platform, and are subject to change. If you are a job seeker or not it is a good idea to make sure you are up to date on what 'public' and 'private' means across your networks and what can be seen on your profile from outside your direct connections. Click here for a great article on how to protect your privacy settings online:

Photo by Yew Hui Tan on Pexels.com

#3 Be Consistent

Once you have established what is visible, you need to make sure there is consistency with the profile you have created in your job application and the profile that is visible in a search of your name. Make sure there are no obvious differences in basic information and, if you have time, you could think about sharing some content that is relevant to the job you are seeking or to support your interests and skills. 

Photo by Vanessa Garcia on Pexels.com

#4 Be Mindful

Be mindful of how you might sound to potential employers when commenting. Try to get involved in conversations on Linked In or Facebook groups that are relevant to your field, but always time to consider your responses. Avoid political commentary or bad-mouthing previous co-workers or employers – jokes can be highly subjective so be aware of how things might sound out of context! 

Photo by Lukas on Pexels.com

#5 Keep it Simple

Don't try and cultivate two or three entirely different identities. Simplicity is key and sometimes just making sure you are on top of your privacy settings is enough to keep your professional persona safe. Maybe you don’t use social media, or you are a social spectator, not posting anything yourself.  This is certainly the safest option. However, you may want to make sure you are demonstrating the character and skills you want to put across for your job search, in the digital world especially, you might find no online presence would be detrimental to your job search.  Photo by Andrea Piacquadio

Time to Put it Into Practice

The truth is that there is no one size fits all answer and it depends on the type of job you are looking for, the role, the level of seniority and ultimately your preference and interest in managing your information in the ways above. Start by googling yourself and go from there! For the latest in digital jobs and tips for improving your chances of success, make sure you check out Dot Gap jobs and blog pages.  

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